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The Grey Ghost Lightweight Assault pack is ideal for 24 hour missions or everyday carry. Its slim design and elimination of unnecessary internal organizers has made this pack weigh only 19 ounces and is specifically designed to meet Special Operations weight requirements! Grey Ghost Gear is a reputable player in the survival gear market. They set out to create a pack that fulfills all your needs, while making it as lightweight as possible.

Grey Ghost Lightweight Assault Pack review

Grey Ghost Lightweight Assault Pack reviewThe Grey Ghost Lightweight Assault pack is ideal for 24 hour missions or everyday carry. Its slim design and elimination of unnecessary internal organizers has made this pack weigh only 19 ounces and is specifically designed to meet Special Operations weight requirements! Grey Ghost Gear is a reputable player in the survival gear market. They set out to create a pack that fulfills all your needs, while making it as lightweight as possible. This pack is smaller than others we reviewed , which makes it easier to maneuver in tight spaces and also limits the amount of gear you pack, ensuring that you are not overpacking. Buy the "Grey Ghost Lightweight" Pack Here Overview This pack goes for simplicity with 3 compartments. The large main pocket is a half clamshell design. Although this pack does not have a lot of internal storage built in, this main compartment does have two pockets in the bottom for secure storage and organization within this compartment. The outside of the pack also features plenty of MOLLE webbing to aid in packing in the gear you need. However, the MOLLE webbing is about ⅔ the size of typical webbing. It still works just as effectively, but is another way that "Grey Ghost Gear" was able to cut down on undesired weight. The front pocket has a vertical zipper orientation, and the 3rd pocket in the back is ideal for storing a hydration bladder complete with a pass through opening. The shoulder straps for this pack are thin yet comfortable. They have a sternum strap, but the straps can also be removed and stored in the hydration pouch when not needed. The pack also has a grab handle. The pack also has two sets of hardware that can be used to dock the pack onto armor or a larger pack. Specifications Dimensions: Main Pocket: 17″ tall x 9.5″ wide x 5.5″ deep Front Pocket: 14″ tall x 8″ wide x 2.5″ deep Volume: 1,168.25 cu. In. This pack is made to be durable, but is made out of 500D Cordura Nylon fabric instead of the typical 1000D. The 500D Cordura Nylon fabric is more lightweight than the 1000D, and weighs about half of the typical pack material. Although the fabric is lightweight, it is still very strong and is abrasion resistant. The pack fabric is also treated with a water repellent on the front and has a water resistant coating on the back side of the fabric to aide in water resistance and durability.  This lightweight material will also not stand out in low light scenarios. The pack is available in a variety of patterns: Coyote Brown, Multicam, Kryptek Highlander, Kryptek Mandrake, Kryptek Typhon , PenCott BadLands, PenCott GreenZone, and PenCott SandStorm. What We Like About It This pack easily weighs 30% less than comparable packs of the same size which can make a difference. We like that the pack is made of the lightweight 500D Cordura Nylon, without sacrificing durability. Another thing we like is the inside of the pack is orange, making the pack easily double as a signaling device if necessary. Here is what some customers have said about this backpack: “Best lightweight EDC pack I’ve ever owned. Excellent build quality, the awesome Kryptek Mandrake pattern, and wonderful versatility make this a great bow hunting pack as well as an EDC pack.” Another customer wrote: “Just got the LAP in Typhon. Fantastic job, boys. Perfect for EDC. Quality work and materials, more than reasonable price, and fast shipping. Couldn’t be happier with it. Y’all have a loyal customer. You’ll get much more of my cash in the future.” What We Don’t Like About It When the main compartment is zipped together, there is a small opening left between the zippers. Although not especially problematic, this could allow water to get inside the pack if you’re not careful. We also would like to see larger zipper pulls for easier use when wearing gloves. Conclusion If you are looking for a tactical pack, but don’t want to carry around the weight typical of a normal back, Grey Ghost Gear’s lightweight pack is a great option. Without sacrificing durability or storage ability, this pack is a great alternative to the typical heavy duty tactical backpacks. Buy the Grey Ghost Lightweight pack here

The 4 Best Hunting Spotlights – Reviews 2020 Photo by Stròlic Furlàn / CC BY When you think of hunting with a light, you might think of the cliché of a couple of poachers with spotlights sitting in the woods gunning down deer out in the boonies, but the reality is, in many parts of the US there are ample opportunities to legally hunt animals with a light. Typically, these are species considered a pest by virtue of population size, and it is in the best interest of all to thin the population by any humane means. Enter night hunting. A good hunting light makes it easier than ever to locate predators like coyotes when they are most active, and of course the classic “deer in the headlights” look applies here as well. Either way, night hunting is a popular way to hunt where legal, and there are a ton of lights out there to look over (and we go over what criteria you should look for in the best hunting spotlights after our recommendations). Anyways, we’ve waded through the good, the bad, and the ugly and found 4 great lights for yuo, from handheld to weapon mounted. Take a look! Streamlight Waypoint Spotlight Streamlight 44902 Waypoint Spotlight with 12V DC Power Cord, Black - 550 Lumens Price: $56.17 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:33 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Streamlight is known for high quality weapon-mounted flashlights, so it’s no wonder they bring their years of experience in building combat proven lights to making a top-notch spotlight. This bad boy can off a standard 12v outlet or from four standard C-sized batteries, throws a bright 210 lumen beam off a specially designed parabolic reflector to get maximum range and intensity, and features a shockproof LED bulb with a 50,000 hour rated runtime. In other words, this is a hardcore little handheld spotlight. Get one for hunting or for your car emergency kit or to keep at home when the lights go out. This is a valuable tool and an affordable one too. It’s one of the best hunting spotlights for the money. Orion Predator Rechargeable Hunting Light Orion H30 Red Premium 273 Yards Long Range Predator Hog Varmint Hunting Flashlight Light Kit with Remote Pressure Switch, Rechargeable Battery and Charger Price: $129.95 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:33 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. How about getting a nice red or green high intensity hunting light that mounts to your favorite scope? Great idea, right? This light ( see full specs ) is just the ticket for an intense night of coyote hunting. Featuring a powerful 300 lumen red or green light, rechargeable battery, rings to mount on a standard 1” rifle scope, variable power output, rugged titanium finished steel bezel, a 273 yard range, and military grade construction, and a remote pressure switch, this is one tough light. Personally, it’s my top choice for night hog or coyote hunts, and at this price, there is little reason not to invest in this tough little number. WindFire Barrel Mounted Light WINDFIRE WF-802 350 Lumens Waterproof Tactical Flashlight 250 "Yards Long Range" Throwing RED LED Coyote Hog Hunting Torch with Pressure Switch & Barrel Mount & 18650 Rechargeable Battery and Charger Price: $36.98 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:33 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. On a budget? Spent all your money on premium ammo and building the ultimate varmint gun? Forgot the light? Got some spare dough in your pocket? Well, here is a powerful and elegant solution. The WindFire waterproof tactical flashlight throws a powerful 350 lumen red beam that cuts through the night out to 250 yards. Comes complete with barrel mounting hardware, a rechargeable battery, remote pressure switch, and can even be used as a standalone flashlight when not mounted on your rifle. The absolute best spotlight for hunting at night that you can get on a budget. Might even be worth getting two; one for the rifle and one in case an upright, two-legged coyote decides to break into your house. Kohree Hunting Headlamp Kohree 80000Lux Cree XML U2 LED Coyote Hunting Light K111Lm Mining Headlamp Lighting 20Hours with 4 Optical Filters, 10W, 11000 mAh Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 03:33 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Rounding out our run on the best hunting spotlights, we think this headlamp is a fantastic choice. Nothing beats throwing a powerful beam of light exactly where you are looking. This feature-rich and wallet-friendly light ( see full specs ) comes with four different color filters, a high power, long life battery, 1.2 meter cable so you can mount this light anywhere on your person, a powerful 10w Cree LED, four brightness settings, and attaches to most any hat designed to take an attached light. For hunting, construction work, walking at night, or most any application where a powerful headlamp is useful, this is the light for you! The Low Down on Hunting Spotlights Hunting lights are typically glorified flashlights. What sets them apart from other lights is their more rugged construction, light color, and sometimes the ability to mount on a weapon or hat. You want a hunting light that can stand up to the rigors of hard outdoor use, and still turn on as long as the battery has a charge. The predator-hunting spotlights will mount to your rifle or hat, while others prefer a handheld spotlight. Hunting lights will be mostly (legally) used on predator and varmint hunts. If you want to play Bubba spotlighting a deer, we don’t want to hear about it! The needs of a raccoon, coyote, or hog hunter neatly overlap to the point where you could use the same gear for any of it. Typically, night hunting involves going after predator animals when they are most active and catching them in the act so to speak. A good hunting light will help you find your quarry by illuminating their eyes or lighting them up in a tree. The best hunting lights are red or green, as this preserves your night vision, while still serving as a useful and effective light. After all, nobody wants to be in the woods and blinded by their own light. Ultimately, choosing the best spotlights for hunting comes down to power output and batteries. Some lights require special rechargeable batteries, although spares can be had, and they typically have an output of up to ten hours, which ensures a long hunt. When in doubt, carry a spare charged battery and you are good to go. Power and range of beam are two other topics, both of which have resulted in much spilled ink. I wouldn’t bother with a light that couldn’t throw a solid beam at least 150 yards, and many will do two or three times that with ease. The focus of the beam is important too, as you don’t want too narrow, nor too broad a beam. When in doubt, go into a dark room and turn on the light to see for yourself how it works. After that, it’s just a question of if you are mounting it on top of your rifle scope (I like this method) or on the barrel of your rifle (tidier but more muzzle heavy) or on your person. The best hunting spotlight will bring joy and success to your hunt, and should be carefully studied on before buying. Boyd Smith Owner of Reloaderaddict.com, Boyd Smith is a major handgun enthusiast, and although he owns Glocks, he prefers the revolving wheel type.  His go-to guns are a Smith & Wesson 642 Performance Center for carry and a Ruger GP100 in the nightstand biometric safe (he has kids).  He loads both revolvers with old-school 148-grain Federal Gold Medal .38 wadcutters.  It’s OK if you think he’s a wimp. Email him . Share the Post and Images Related Posts The 4 Best Hunting Watches "– Reviews 2020" The 4 Best Hunting Sunglasses – Reviews 2020 The 4 Best Hunting Rifle Slings – Reviews 2020

[Review] Mossberg 930 SPX Tactical: Super Reliable

[Review] Mossberg 930 SPX Tactical: Super Reliable

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s In my years of law enforcement, I never went without a shotgun, and it was always a pump-action . The thought process in my esteemed career for so long has been relegated to trashing semi-auto guns as unreliable. There’s a whole lot of sexy wrapped up in a package like this. If you want to destroy a gun’s chances in law enforcement (most markets I imagine), simply call it unreliable . No one wants to imagine a scenario where they pull the trigger in a desperately justified situation only to have nothing happen. Worse still, the gun malfunctions and you are stuck with an expensive impact tool. Thankfully, I have just enough rebellion within me to cast these old reservations to the side and test standards out for myself. After all, things can change. Can’t they? Mossberg 930 SPX Tactical 830 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 830 at "Palmetto State Armory" Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) KyGunCo (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Hang on as I go through everything you ever wanted to know about the Mossberg 930 SPX Tactical shotgun! Table of Contents Loading... Semi Vs. Pump The 930 Tactical 8-shot SPX is a rather long name that gives us some clues as to the intended use. The first stop, of course, is that it is a gas-operated, semi-auto shotgun. What does this mean? It’s the kind of shotgun you load up by putting multiple shells in the magazine (tube). Once you rack the charging handle, you can pull the trigger and fire repeatedly without doing anything else. The shotgun harnesses the gas from the shell to cycle the action. There are also inertia driven semi-autos, but that’s a different article. Pump guns require you to cycle the gun—pulling the handle back ejects the spent shell and loads a fresh one—every time you fire, until empty. Historically, pump guns have a better reputation for feeding and shooting reliably. With a massive charging handle, Picatinny rail, large bolt-release button, and protected ghost-ring sight, this is not your daddy’s shotgun! Tactical Vs. Hunting The moniker “tactical” is in this name and it’s a doozy. What does “tactical” mean? It depends on who you ask, but to me, it’s pretty specific. I like features that enable me to smoothly operate the gun (training and familiarity are givens) efficiently and effectively in high-stress situations. For example, this shotgun has a pistol grip. I like it for maneuvering the still relatively long gun. The controls are large, particularly the charging handle and bolt release. This is important because things go to hell when your heart rate gets high in exciting situations (like a shooting). We lose fine motor control around 115-120 beats per minute though training—if present—factors heavily. Translation: bad things happen when the squiggly line squiggles too fast The bolt release button and charging handle are quite robust on this gun. The knurled handle isn’t ridiculous but it is designed with gripping and ripping in mind. By way of comparison, think about the relatively smooth and recessed (think snag-free) controls on a hunting shotgun. This is because geese aren’t armed and coming for you. These items are of incredible importance as they directly affect how reloads go. Hunting shotguns would look more like tactical shotguns if prey shot back. Some other nice tactical features are the Picatinny rail on the receiver, allowing you to mount whatever close engagement optic you might prefer. Additionally, the ghost ring sights (with fiber optic) were an extremely nice touch. From the first glance, pulling this gun out of the box, it was ready for a mortal engagement and I do not say that lightly. The front, fiber optic sight is great in daylight, easy to pickup through the rear ghost ring. Show Vs. Go I would not be worth my salt were I to simply be wooed by tactical features. Nay good reader, I headed to the range with a veritable cornucopia of shotgun shells to test how the gun might perform. I had read varying experiences amongst different users with various Mossberg 930 models, but I placed all this aside with my reptilian/law enforcement reservations about semis, donned my science cap, and started shooting. I had the 930 for several months and took it to the range five times. Some of the features sang out as soon as I started loading. Turning the shotgun over on its side, it seemed loading was optimized. Dropping a shell into the open chamber, I cleared my hand and hit the large bolt release button allowing it to slam home. Simply sliding the next shell in, pushing the elevator down, then forcing the follower down the tube, felt smooth. In fact, it felt like it was built to run fast if I could muster the acumen. This gaping maw made loading a breeze. Mounting the shotgun to my shoulder everything felt comfortable, the ergonomics felt good. The pistol grip was perfect for my wrist, having a good angle and three large finger grooves. The forend had a semi-grippy texture and its length offered multiple options for hand placement due to shooter size or position, meaning shooters could choke up closer to the receiver or stretch out as they saw fit. Ammunition When shooting 2 ¾ inch shells, the 930 Tactical SPX has a capacity of 7+1. For 3-inch shells, its 6+1. I did not know how much punishment I would be putting myself through during the testing of this gun so I decided to pace myself. Some 12-gauge shells aren’t so bad, while others are absolute shoulder busters. I used a wide array of offerings, wanting to test reliability as well as the feel of the gun. I started with multiple loads of bird shot shooting 2 ¾ inch 8s and 9s with no real surprises. Everything fed, fired, and cleared nicely. The impact of these shots was minimal. Remington #9 2-3/4" Bird Shot 8 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 8 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing However, I moved up to 3-inch magnums in #4 shot and found myself smarting after a couple magazines of these. Plus, the barrel started to heat up pretty significantly. Regardless, the shells ran great. Incidentally, magazine capacity for the 930 I tested is 7+1 for 2 ¾-inch shells, 6+1 for 3-inch. I then proceeded to a few different brands of buckshot and eventually ran some rifled slugs. These hit pretty hard but the damage downrange was impressive. I repeated this a few times before upgrading the gun. Federal LE Tactical with FliteControl 12ga 00 Buck 4.25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 4.25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Mesa Tactical I really wanted a light on the gun and could not find an option that replaced the forend with an integrated weapon-light version (like I’ve seen for the ubiquitous Remington 870). Mesa Tactical had a magazine clamp that fits between the barrel and magazine tube. It has a QD mount on one side and a Picatinny rail on the other. I was happy to install this and stuck a Streamlight TLR-1 on the pic-rail. Editor's Choice (Pistol Light) Streamlight TLR-1 108 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 108 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing While I wouldn’t call this solution perfect as far as ergonomics go, it was a lot better than what I started with. I added a sling and went back to the range. The Mesa Tactical Magazine Clamp solved two riddles, sling and light attachment. There may be gun writers out there that have all the answers. I’m not one of them. During my fourth trip to the range I was blasting away with the 930 when the Mesa Tactical forend clamp went flying. I suspect the 3-inch magnums may have had something to do with it, but more than likely it was user error. StreamLight TLR-1 for turning night into day I reached out to the company and got the torque settings (11-inch pounds is the official answer, so 13 is even better) and returned to the range somewhat humbled. Performance I shot like a man possessed, only setting the gun down long enough to open a new box. I liked how the sling allowed me to hang the gun and work on my reloads. I really started to wonder how long it would be before I experienced some kind of issue. I realized I had surpassed 300 rounds and hadn’t even cleaned the Mossberg. I had heard gas guns could be finicky or temperamental—not this one. The dual-gas vent system was solid. I measured the trigger on a Lyman Digital Gauge and it averaged 4.6 pounds. There was roughly 1mm of creep, a slight build, then a snap. Reset was a little longer but gave a mild click I could feel. Overall, it was great. Perhaps most importantly, if called upon to do so, I could get 8 rounds downrange in under 2 seconds. That is a frightening amount of firepower in a short amount of time. The trigger works well. I walked out to 50 yards and shot for accuracy, very pleased at how I was able to use the fiber-optic sights to empty a mag in my man-sized target. I was continually impressed with the accuracy, but more importantly, the reliability of the gun. Through 350 shotgun shells of varying brands and size, I had no malfunctions. The Scientific Method I remembered I had set off with the notion semi-auto shotguns were not reliable and deemed to challenge that. About halfway through I thought I might want to clean the gun and give it a fair shake. Because I had not experienced the slightest issue, I persevered instead. When the smoke cleared, I had fired off a shoulder-blistering amount of shells without a single malfunction. The Mossberg 930 Tactical 8-shot SPX chewed them up and kept spitting them out. 12ga Shotgun Shells, Opened (L to R: Bird, Buck, Slug) I had to admit, were I still out on the road today, I’d be comfortable trading up the pump gun for this shooter. By The Numbers Reliability: 5/5 I have to guess I’d run into some issues at some point. Few firearms are made to withstand complete neglect. I feel like 350 shells without a cleaning is outstanding. I shot quality brands like Remington, Winchester, and Federal, but I used a wide array of loads of various power. Ergonomics: 4/5 Some people don’t like pistol grip shotguns and I get it. When learning to shoot long distance, I was taught to use a relaxed grip with my trigger hand. It applies to shotguns too. I genuinely like the ergonomics of this gun and I think most people would be able to use it fairly well. There are versions of the 930 Tactical with a more normal grip, if that’s what you’re into. Best Budget Semi Mossberg 930 Tactical 650 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 650 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Accuracy: 5/5 Some folks think a shotgun sprays like a ruptured firehose but this is not the case. Being able to hit center mass on a man-sized target at 50-yards was easy with this gun. It could probably do even better. Customization: 3/5 Here I’m a little disappointed. It seems like there are more versions of the 930 out there than you can shake a stick at. However, a shotgun, especially one designated for tactical scenarios, should be able to accept a flashlight, and maybe a sling. Thanks to the folks at Mesa Tactical, you can do both. Value: 4/5 The MSRP on this shotgun (specifically, the 930 Tactical – 8 Shot SPX – Pistol Grip in tan) is $1,078.00. I found a few online that were a couple of hundred dollars cheaper but took note that it wasn’t by much. I don’t feel there is a great deal of overvalue like you sometimes see when there is a huge disparity between MSRP and actual market pricing. This shotgun is accurate, powerful, and reliable. Mossberg 930 SPX Tactical 830 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 830 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) KyGunCo (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Overall: 4/5 Conclusion At $1,000 plus you might be tempted to stop and weigh out your options. That’s a lot of cheddar. But the Mossberg 930 SPX Tactical is super reliable, ergonomically decent with its various models, and accurate. It really depends on what role you have in mind. To my estimation, this gun is designed for tactical applications. I could easily envision it in service with a SWAT team but it could also serve as a terrifying home defender. With a street price in the 800s, this is a lean mean shell flinging machine. Mossberg 930 SPX Tactical 830 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 830 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) KyGunCo (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Thanks to Liberty Firearms Institute for handling my transfers. What do you think about Semi Vs. Pump? Maybe you’d take an O/U or S/S instead? Let us know in the comments! For more awesome semi-auto shotties, take a look at the Best Semi-Automatic Shotguns [Buyer’s Guide] !

Survival Shotgun Part 1: 6 Reasons You Need One

Survival Shotgun Part 1: 6 Reasons You Need One

A shotgun is a valuable tool that should be in every survival toolkit.  In today’s environment the shotgun can be a bit of a question mark; it’s more powerful than a pistol but has less range than a rifle, and limited magazine capacity.  It’s not always clear when or how to deploy the shotgun. Here are 6 good reasons every survivalist needs one. See the others: Part 2: Choosing Gauge and Type Part 3: Choosing The Gun Part 4: Understanding Loads Part 5: Myths Explained Part 6: Cleaning and Maintenance Quick Navigation 1. Power and Performance 2. Versatility of Ammunition 3. Price and Availability 4. Legislative Protection 5. Ease of Maintenance 6. Modular Part 2 1. Power and Performance A shotgun is a large step up in force from a handgun.  Since their inception they’ve been know as a solid performer.  The they have been the backup long arm for law enforcement for at least a hundred years.  Shotguns have been used to such great effect in the closed-in trenches of World War I that Germany protested their use and threatened execution for any troops found in possession of them. 2. Versatility of Ammunition Shotguns can fire rounds that other small arms usually can not.  An example is bird shot, which can get small game for food, or less lethal rounds like beanbags that are meant to stop violent encounters without causing serious harm.  There are less lethal weapon systems, but they are expensive and can only deploy less lethal rounds.  Only the shotgun is capable of firing both rounds (and more.) 3. Price and Availability Shotguns have a high availability, and are cheaper than most rifles.  With a few hundred dollars you can walk into a local superstore and purchase a shotgun in most of America.  This means you can afford to upgrade your preparedness right now.  You should still save up for that semi-auto rifle, but you can bump up your firepower now.  Shotguns are also cheap enough that you can hand one out to upgrade a member of your team’s load out if they do not have a long arm. 4. Legislative Protection The shotgun is looked at as a sporting arm by legislators and usually the last type of weapon to be banned or legislated against.  This is not always the case, but even in cities like Chicago it is legal to own a shotgun where handguns and large capacity magazines are completely banned.  This may be extremely helpful for the urban survivalist. Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA 5. Ease of Maintenance Most shotguns are very easy to maintain.  You can clean and maintain a pump shotgun cheap and easy with both commercial and improvised supplies.  A cleaning kit can take up no more than the space of a coffee mug if you wish.  You can pack a spare cleaning kit in your Bug Out Bag and not worry about it going bad or ruining the contents of your pack.  Improvised supplies are all dual use items, making maintenance even easier. 6. Modular Shotguns are modular.  You can take a basic “home defense” model and swap the short barrel with a long game barrel and hunt rabbit or duck.  You can change the furniture from wood to synthetic to reduce weight and increase strength.  You can swap the stock for a pistol grip if you want a backpack gun.  The options are endless, but you have to make wise choices; one bad part could compromise the reliability of your shotgun. I am not suggesting the shotgun be the only weapon in your survival toolkit, but it is a powerful tool that can be adapted for many situations.  There are some big limitations that you will be made aware of, but it should be obvious that force, cost, diversity, and adaptability are the main strengths of the shotgun. Part 2 Part 2 of the Survival Shotgun series by mr. Smashy : Survival Shotgun Part 2: Choosing Gauge and Type Photo by: mr. smashy Save Other interesting articles: "Survival Shotgun Part" 4: Understanding Loads Survival Shotgun Part 2: Choosing Gauge and Type Survival Shotgun Part 8: Mossberg M500SP Loadout Survival Shotgun Part 3: Choosing the Gun

Ballistic Geeks: Why the 6.8 SPC is Nothing Special at TFB.

A data driven discussion on bolt thrust, the ballistic inferiority of 6.8 SPC, and all other manner of geeky ballistic data! Heaven! Summary: 5.56 aint that bad. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print visit website

A Review of Nexbelt for Concealed Carry and EDC

Advertisment A belt is a belt, no? No. While picking a belt for concealed carry isn’t nearly as much as choosing an EDC pistol , it is no-less important. NexBelt is a radically new design to a rather timeless object and is ideal for concealed carry. Contents NexBelt Concealed Carry Belt Other "Concealed Carry Belt" Designs Cobra Buckles Mean Gene Leather Concealed Carry Belts 5.11 Nylon "Concealed Carry Belts" Parting Shots NexBelt Concealed Carry Belt The version I’m reviewing is black leather with a rather plain looking buckle. It seems simple enough. Most men I know don’t give a second thought to their dress belts, but this one is different. From the outside, there’s nothing that gives away its unique design. It is urban camouflage. Under the hood, though, this is a different beast. The leather is backed with nylon webbing. The combination of the two materials makes it more rigid than leather, alone. As such, this one should hold its shape long into the future (just be sure to take care of the leather). The buckle, though, is where the magic happens. Like most belts, the NexBelt connects at the rear of the buckle. Rather than using traditional clasps, or Chicago screws, the NexBelt has a lock-down clasp and two small screws that hold the buckle firmly to the belt. And the buckle itself is built like a tank. On the other side of the belt is what catches everyone’s attention. The buckle has a small claw-type-ratchet (for lack of a better description). The inside of the belt itself has a red polymer track. The teeth on this track catch the ratchet hook. While most belt holes are ¾” to 1” apart, this can be dialed in at closer to ¼” intervals. To release the belt, a lever pulls up the hook and lets the tail slide free. It is almost like a wide zip-tie that you cinch in place around your waist. Yet you can loosen it much more easily. The benefit of this system is easy to see. Once it is clasped in place, this belt doesn’t move. For those carrying heavy guns, this is a real benefit, as the weight isn’t working against you. And you can dial in the perfect fit so there’s no slack (or so it isn’t too tight). Working on losing weight? No problem. It will still fit. Eating a massive Thanksgiving feast? No worries—the belt will expand as needed. These everyday adjustments that are crucial to every day carry—the NexBelt is ideal for them. Other Concealed Carry Belt Designs Cobra Buckles Other belt designs have tried in other ways to combat the fit and slip problems. One of my favorite designs is the cobra buckle . This is my go-to for outside the waistband carry. For a full-sized gun, this is hard to beat. But they’re hardly easy to use. Once they’re set, you’re set—but getting them on and off is work. If I know I’m going someplace where I have to have the very best and most secure fit, this is the belt I wear. It is too wide, though, for most of the belt loops on my pants, so I have to plan ahead. And the belt makes me look like a gun guy, which I try to avoid when I’m carrying concealed. "Mean Gene Leather" Concealed Carry Belts For my EDC, I typically use this belt from Mean Gene . It is leather with a nylon inner core. It has held up amazingly well, even though I’ve lost a Chicago screw. The roller buckle grabs the leather well. I’ve never had it slip, and I can keep it sized perfectly. One benefit it has over the NexBelt is that the concept is hardly revolutionary. This belt works just like my Scout belt did when I was a kid, even though the design is more radical. More traditional belts, like this plain leather belt, leave more to be desired. When you are putting a gun in your waistband, you need more belt. That means buying a bigger belt and maybe wearing an awkwardly long belt if you aren’t carrying. The benefit is that your belt doesn’t draw any attention to itself. And the design has been around for thousands of years, so it must be doing something right. Just remember to buy one big enough to wrap around your waist and your holster. 5.11 Nylon Concealed Carry Belts Simple nylon belts , like this one from 5.11, are light, easy to use, and finicky. I wore this one on a hike this weekend. The sweatier I got, the more the belt slipped loose. I keep this one with my get-home-gun, just in case. It works fine, but it isn’t my favorite. The benefit, though, is that it fits my fat ass, and my wife’s much narrower waist, and even my son’s. One belt to rule them all. Almost. Sort of. But it is very adjustable. And it is wider, too, which is better for my OWB holster. Parting Shots All told, you need something you can rely on. The NexBelt is solid and holds tight. Inside the belt, there are numerous markings that help you to determine how long it needs to be. The lines even help you keep your cuts straight. Try it with a variety of holsters. If you have an OWB and IWB for the same gun, try on both. See how much extra might be needed in order to accommodate both. The main thing is that you cut the belt long enough to allow you to really maximize the use of the red track below the tail. If you run out of track because you have left the belt too long, it will not work as intended. In the end, what impresses me most about NexBelt is the strength of the buckle. Instead of using traditional pins to hold the buckle to the belt, this one relies on screws. Where there would be pins to hold the buckle’s moving parts, there are screws. This is a beast. And there are numerous buckle designs, too, that doesn’t look at all tactical. Prices vary, of course. The MSRP on this one here is $62.99. That’s not bad for a belt that will last forever (as long as you continue to care for it). And don’t worry, NexBelts makes brown belts as well.

Summary

The Grey Ghost Lightweight Assault pack is ideal for 24 hour missions or everyday carry. Its slim design and elimination of unnecessary internal organizers has made this pack weigh only 19 ounces and is specifically designed to meet Special Operations weight requirements! Grey Ghost Gear is a reputable player in the survival gear market. They set out to create a pack that fulfills all your needs, while making it as lightweight as possible.